We are pleased to release a collection of short improvisations, ‘Thank you for your quick reply.”. In 2008 Jon and Andrew (along with others such as Adam Goodwin, Felix Tellez, and Michael Morgan) began playing music together in a free improvisation context, later moving towards the exploration of text scores. After four years of focusing on text as a medium for musical ideas, this album reaches back to the roots of anteroom, and drops instruction altogether to rely solely on the internal and external communicative act of music performance. The two primary goals during the recording of this album were 1) to discuss what kind of music would occur as little as possible, and 2) to have fun. This album was most certainly enjoyable to record.



Jon Jackson – Drums
Andrew Jordan Miller – Rhodes
Thank you to Chaz Underriner and Greg Dixon for their fantastic engineering and mastering work respectively.

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§316 · March 27, 2014 · audio ·


2005(1)
Manfred Werder
(text)

anteroom’s realization of Manfred Werder’s composition “2005/1″ has been released by Another Timbre as part of an online collection of different realizations of the piece by different musicians from around the world. Listen to anteroom’s realization.

Special thanks to Simon Reynell from Another Timbre for asking us to contribute to this project.  Many thanks to Manfred for writing such a beautiful score.

 

Recording Notes:

“Fifteen minutes divided into three five minute sections, each corresponding to a different interpretation of the text score, similar to our previous performance of the work. In the first section, we placed time-sounds (radio alarm and alarm buzzer) spatially and temporally. In the second section, we contributed performative sounds to the place, time and sounds already present. In the final section we allowed the place and time of the performance space to sound by increasing the gain of the environmental sounds outside the performance space which were being gathered by microphones positioned through open windows and amplified through two speakers on either side of us.”

Recorded at Emergent Media Labs, Denton, TX
Recorded and Mixed by Jason Fick

Manfred Werder

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§302 · May 23, 2013 · audio, scores, video, writings ·


ON DEMAND
Nicolas G. Miller
(instructions)
(text)

The score is divided into four documents: the text for recitation, the instructions (which read as stage directions), an audio file, and a video file for projection.

In speaking with Miller it was explained he had intentionally left recitation instructions rather vague in keeping with anteroom’s preference for openness and indeterminancy in scores. After numerous attempts at vocal delivery, it was decided to present the words much in the vocal tradition established by Robert Ashley and extended by Miller (A POTENTIALLY GOOD EXPERIENCE, IM NOT A BAD MAN IM JUST A BAD WIZARD) of punishing and difficult monotony which, according to several audience members, had the tendency to transition with time into soothing and atmospheric ambiance.

The film and textual material in ON DEMAND is appropriated from online browsing experiences of analog playback devices having been digitally documented and uploaded by members of Youtube, a popular video sharing virtual community. The audio of said videos was stripped and transposed into a single text document left for the performers to interpret. The seperate audio file included in the score was created by the composer and seems to be influenced by dub-step, a current and popular dance music style.

performed 27 May 2012 in Dallas, Texas at The Reading Room by anteroom.

Nicolas G. Miller

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§287 · August 31, 2012 · audio ·


II. I.
Adam Goodwin
(score)

The piece is divided into two untitled movements which, with permission from Goodwin, anteroom performed in reverse order. In movement II. Goodwin, inspired by a recent interaction with Jaap Blonk, has arranged a system of connected groups of phonetic characters the performers are to move through freely. The phonemes are pulled from the first word of movement I. consider. Movement I. is entirely text-based and offers a meta-structure for a piece. It is an excellent example of the kinds of text-scores which originally sparked our interest in the medium. It’s openness allows the performer to pour oneself freely into the music and into the performance, while its general guidelines offer helpful direction which aid in preserving a coherent intention throughout an ensemble.

Our process for realizing movement I. was as follows: improvise with the words with no prior discussion, discuss patterns and metaphors we noticed, improvise under more guidance, sketch a general graphic score, refine delivery. Through this process we were able to agree upon a point of unity which was realized by dropping metal coins into metal pots and revolving them in a counter-clockwise motion. We established two stages to precede the point of unity. First, Miller moved wood against wood in a vertical motion while Jackson moved wood against metal in a circular motion. Second, Miller moved skin against skin in a sweeping motion resulting in a rapid vibration between the two materials; Jackson, meanwhile, rapidly vibrated metal against metal. Each stage was divided into two characteristics: material and gesture. In stage one neither material nor gesture aligned between Miller and Jackson. In stage two gesture aligned while material did not. In stage three both material and gesture aligned. Thus, a simple three step motion towards a point of unity, followed by a pause, and, finally, a slow detachment.

performed 27 May 2012 in Dallas, Texas at The Reading Room by anteroom.

Adam Goodwin

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§281 · August 31, 2012 · audio, scores, video, writings ·


Nocturne Series: 4
Chaz Underrinner

Having just finished studies in composition with Michael Pisaro, Underrinner has arranged a piece steeped heavily in the tradition of Cagean silence established by Cage and extended recently by groups like the Edition Wandleweiser, of which Pisaro is a part. Interestingly, Underrinner has chosen to merge the practice of field recording and performance by providing previously composed field recordings and asking the performers to place speakers about the space. The performers are to interact with the speakers, ultimately filtering out various frequencies and adjusting the spatiality of the field recording being interacted with.

In contrast with the stillness and quietness of the sound, the composer has asked quite a bit of the performers in the sense that, in addition to playing notes on pitched instruments and interacting with the speakers, each of the ten field recording is to be turned on and off at particular second markings. To achieve this accurately, anteroom composed an additional track for each recording provided with the playback cuts composed in so that we could avoid having to achieve this manually in performance.

performed 27 May 2012 in Dallas, Texas at The Reading Room by anteroom.

Chaz Underrinner

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§274 · August 31, 2012 · audio ·


Back

Each Sound Longer than the Last
Martin Back

Back presents a fibonacci sequence as an initial pallette of temporal options along side several restrictions which reveal multiple paths into timbral and rhythmic choices for the performers to make.

anteroom has decided to remain true to the implied instruction of the title by selecting numbers from the fibonacci sequence which increase in magnitude; additionally the options of using the numbers as a system of counting, and repeated striking of percussion instruments were chosen.

The resulting experience for the performers was that of particular cognitive interest. Throughout the performance a silent tempo, agreed upon by visual cues and faith, was sounding within our imaginations as well as the two tempos being performed on our instruments for the audience. While the audience may have experienced Reichian phasing of two tempos, the performers were experiencing phasing occuring on a third intellectual level, making the piece particularly difficult and interesting to perform.

performed 27 May 2012 in Dallas, Texas at The Reading Room by anteroom.

Martin Back

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§234 · August 31, 2012 · audio, video, writings ·


27 April 2012
at the jackrabbit
Denton, Texas
in conjunction with The International Home Theater Festival

image by Hillary Whitehead


anteroom opened the night with two pieces: Hedges of Understanding [readings 38] composed by Mark So and movement I of an untitled two movement work composed for anteroom by Adam Goodwin.

Performances by Martin Back, Ulna, and How I Quit Crack followed.

Hedges of Understanding [readings 38], Mark So, (score)
I., Adam Goodwin, (score)


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§193 · May 1, 2012 · images ·


and then
Francesco Gagliardi
(score)



Looking at the score structurally, we find three sections of articulation. First a section of single words, followed by a section of photographs and finally a phrasal section consisting of full sentences. Each section features four groups. The first three are always isolated individuals while the final fourth is composed of a pair, suggesting a correlation between each group across the three sections. The final instruction of suggested duration, perhaps the most objective and easily attached to a historical practice of music, falls just outside the noted pattern.

The intention in performance was to wade the area along the spectrum of listening which this piece addresses; which seems to be somewhere between casual listening and a kind of unperceived ambiance. We wanted to encourage a kind of listening where sounds are experienced but not always noted so closely, so as to allow them to blend into one another without the complete awareness of the listener. This intention was embedded within a higher goal of facilitating a time of serene monotony, where no single moment stands out, no form or narrative is remembered, rather, an experience for which a state of mind or a certain color would suffice as a description. Kind of like remembering a walk through the park, and not thinking of a woman seen, or a puddle stepped in, or any other details in particular, but just that it happened, and that somehow it was very nice.

The chosen instrumentation consisted of amplifier hum, field recording pushed through small speakers, peruvian flute, yarn, coins, lighter, rain jacket, book, along with various woods, metals, glass, and ceramics.

performed 20 october 2011 in Denton, Texas at UNT on The Square Gallery by anteroom.

Francesco Gagliardi

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§141 · September 21, 2011 · audio, scores, video, writings ·


2005(1)
Manfred Werder
(score)


Manfred Werder (b. 1965) is a Swiss composer whose work addresses the basic elements of musical and auditory experience. His process of relieving musical materials is articulated most elegantly in his recent series of compositions, beginning with 2005(1). The score contains only six words: “ort/zeit/( klänge )” as well as the English “place/time/( sounds )”. He has since created more pieces in this series, all titled after the year and rank of the composition within that year and each focused on the ability of his text scores to create awareness of an environment that we simultaneously inhabit and create for ourselves.

On March 13th, 2011, anteroom performed 2005(1) at Tex Gallery in Denton, TX during the 35 Conferette, an annual event featuring independent music acts from across the country. Our interpretation resulted in a three hour performance of the work informed by three views of the score. First, a linguistic analysis of the English half of the score, which lead to multiple readings of its content through implementing different interpretations of the grammatical and syntactic structure of the score itself. Second, an understanding of the performance practice of Werder’s recent series of works through previously recorded documentation and literature; and finally, a concern for the appropriate place and time for the delivery of 2005(1) as manifested in the 35 Conferette event.

Our performance was divided into three one hour sections, each addressing a different linguistic interpretation of the score. During the first hour, place was interpreted as an imperative verb, and time-sounds as a compound noun resulting in a score that instructs the performers to place, or arrange, time-sounds. This section was realized by placing various ticking clocks in the gallery, as well as arranging for a few electronic alarm clocks and clock radios kept at minimal volume to sound off periodically within the space. We chose intuitively when to activate the snooze feature on each sounding clock, allowing the unique characteristics of each device to determine its own duration of rest.

For the second hour of the performance, all words in the score were interpreted as discrete nouns bringing about three isolated concepts for the performers to consider while playing. This allowed the “world” to emerge in our performance, relating to Werder’s comment, made in an interview with composer James Saunders, about his work “(operating) in relation to our complex situation of being the world, and at the same time observing the world.”† This section was mostly silent with a few sparse, quiet articulations made on different sounding objects – sticks, stones, stirring inside flower pots and metal pans, a few isolated notes on a toy xylophone, the sound of water pouring into a glass, etc. Our activity as performers was governed by our observations of our sonic surroundings during this section, and all articulations sought to achieve a balance with the surroundings.

The third hour of the performance joined place-time as a compound noun. Sounds was interpreted as an infinitive verb resulting in a score that doesn’t so much instruct but rather makes an observation. For this section, we played quiet field recordings of the sounds produced within 35 Conferette from the previous day, capturing distant music, applause, and traffic. About midway through this hour, the sounds surrounding the gallery were amplified inside the performance space using a microphone previously placed through a gallery window.

Overall, our performance of 2005(1) strove to consider both the linguistic and conceptual readings of the score. Conceptually the three sections stand independently of one another, while linguistically they rely upon each other to create a formal continuity though the palindromic arrangement of the sections: verb, noun / nouns / noun, verb.


† Saunders, James, ‘Fourteen Musicians’, in The Ashgate Research Companion to Experimental Music (Farnam, England: 2009), pp. 353 – 357


performed march 13, 2011 by anteroom
at Tex Gallery in Denton, Texas
photos courtesy of Fields Harrington

Manfred Werder

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§106 · August 1, 2011 · images, scores, writings ·


To restore silence is the role of objects
Sam Sfirri
(score)
(listen)


Here Sfirri considers the the ambience of natural silence not only a palette of musical possibility, but also the extreme dynamic of the piece. Silence becomes a kind of inherent screaming tutti, arranged and laid atop the reflection of its very intention.

The sounds of this recording are produced by a small array of objects including one guitar amplifier, one am radio, and two field recordings each being pushed out a set of small speakers. The sounds are intended to meld into a certain composed silence which, layer by layer, is stepped into the silence intrinsic to the time of listening to the recording. Microphones were placed quite close to each object, encouraging a contextual dissonance between the production and the metaphor of the sounds.

performed march 2011 in Denton, Texas by anteroom.
recorded by Brian Hernandez at the University of North Texas.

Sam Sfirri

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§71 · July 18, 2011 · audio, scores, writings ·